Silver-Washed Fritillary

This beautiful fritillary is one of Britain’s largest butterflies. Like many species, it declined during the twentieth century, but it is now making some encouraging recovery, particularly in southern England. While the adult butterfly enjoys flying in the sunshine, the caterpillar foodplant is Common Dog-violet, which grows in woodland shade, so it needs carefully managed woodland areas with glades or rides in order to thrive.

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Common Blue Damselfly

Common Blue Damselflies can be seen throughout the main College grounds, but especially over and around Swan Lake, where they often emerge in their hundreds.

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Stag Beetle

This magnificent beetle is Britain’s largest and is, sadly, quite scarce now. The male’s huge ‘antlers’ are in fact overgrown mandibles (jaws) for courtship display and are generally too large and unwieldy for the beetle to be able to bite with them.

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Large Red Damselfly

This damselfly is usually the first to be seen in spring, in April or even late March. Males are mostly red, with black tails. Females are also red and black, with varying amounts of black, but always more than the males.

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Dark Green Fritillary

This large fritillary, while relatively widespread nationally, is scarce and declining in this region. Indeed, the specimen pictured is the only one recorded within a 10km radius in 2020.

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