Rose Chafer

These stunning jewel-like beetles are members of the scarab family. The adults feed on pollen and nectar, and sometimes petals, particularly from roses, hence their name. The larvae develop in compost or rotting wood for two years. You may see and hear the adults flying very loudly and clumsily in late spring and summer, especially in College Garden.

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Silver-Studded Blue

This small, rare butterfly is a UK BAP (Biodiversity Action Plan) Priority Species. Its greatest threat is loss of its heathland habitat.

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Common Blue Damselfly

Common Blue Damselflies can be seen throughout the main College grounds, but especially over and around Swan Lake, where they often emerge in their hundreds.

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Stag Beetle

This magnificent beetle is Britain’s largest and is, sadly, quite scarce now. The male’s huge ‘antlers’ are in fact overgrown mandibles (jaws) for courtship display and are generally too large and unwieldy for the beetle to be able to bite with them.

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Large Red Damselfly

This damselfly is usually the first to be seen in spring, in April or even late March. Males are mostly red, with black tails. Females are also red and black, with varying amounts of black, but always more than the males.

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