Pale Tussock

The eye-catching caterpillars of this moth can often be seen in early autumn, wandering near trees, looking for somewhere to pupate. They spend their caterpillar lifespan feeding in a range of broadleaved tree species and then descend to fashion a tent out of a fallen leaf and spin a stunning double cocoon inside in which to pupate. They emerge in late spring or early summer as a velvety, but much more muted, adult. They have been seen at several sites throughout the estate.

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Elephant Hawk-Moth

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