Neil Hulme - Rewilding

Talk - Neil Hulme - Rewilding

November 2022 – tbc

Neil Hulme has been Conservation Officer for Sussex Butterfly Conservation for over twelve years, co-authoring the fabulous ‘Butterflies of Sussex: A Twenty-First Century Atlas’ (2017). In 2017, he received the MBE for his successful efforts in conserving the rare Duke of Burgundy and Pearl-bordered Fritillary butterflies. Neil is passionate about rewilding and is a member of the Advisory Board for the pioneering Knepp Estate rewilding project in West Sussex, detailed in Isabella Tree’s ‘Wilding: the return of nature to a British farm’ (2018).

Featured Events

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WALKING TOUR

Wellington College Head of Gardens and Countryside, Mark Dodd, will take us on a tour of the College gardens and share fascinating insights, including some of the delights and challenges of looking after this 440 acre site.

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Latest Updates

Great Spotted Woodpecker

The Greater Spotted Woodpecker is one of two Woodpecker species that we have here at Wellington. The other being the Green Woodpecker. The Greater Spotted Woodpecker can be seen and often heard drumming from the trees as it looks for food in dead branches and also in Springtime can use the drumming to call a mate and establish territory. The Woodpecker nests in holes in trees that it is able to hollow out. It feeds on grubs, bugs and insects and also will take young birds from nests if it gets a chance. It is a fairly common visitor to garden bird feeders on-site as well.

Goldcrest

goldcrest The Goldcrest is surprisingly common at Wellington but rather difficult to spot. Britain’s joint smallest bird, along with the Firecrest, it nests in the

Greylag Goose

A very distinctive bird with its pinkish-orange bill and pink legs, the Greylag Goose is a new visitor to Swan Lake, making its first appearance in the Spring of 2021.

Latest Updates

Great Spotted Woodpecker

The Greater Spotted Woodpecker is one of two Woodpecker species that we have here at Wellington. The other being the Green Woodpecker. The Greater Spotted Woodpecker can be seen and often heard drumming from the trees as it looks for food in dead branches and also in Springtime can use the drumming to call a mate and establish territory. The Woodpecker nests in holes in trees that it is able to hollow out. It feeds on grubs, bugs and insects and also will take young birds from nests if it gets a chance. It is a fairly common visitor to garden bird feeders on-site as well.

Goldcrest

goldcrest The Goldcrest is surprisingly common at Wellington but rather difficult to spot. Britain’s joint smallest bird, along with the Firecrest, it nests in the

Greylag Goose

A very distinctive bird with its pinkish-orange bill and pink legs, the Greylag Goose is a new visitor to Swan Lake, making its first appearance in the Spring of 2021.

Wren

The Wren, one of Britain’s smallest birds, is a resident here at Wellington College. It is more likely to be heard than seen and its tic-tic-tic and strrrrrrr call indicate that they are around.