Damsel & Dragonflies

Damsel & Dragonflies at Welly

Dragonflies and damselflies are from the same order, Odonata, meaning toothed jaws. Damselflies are smaller and slimmer, have a more fluttering flight and rest with their wings closed together over their back like a butterfly. Dragonflies are larger and sturdier, have a more powerful flight and rest with their wings held straight out like a crucifix. Both develop as larvae in water for one or two years, or even longer in some of the larger species of dragonfly. They are one of the more primitive orders of insect and are hemimetabolous, which means they do not pupate, unlike butterflies for example. Instead, the adult emerges straight from the larval skin. They can be found all over the College estate in spring and summer. They develop in our various ponds and lakes and some species travel quite far from their larval waters once they are adults.

Latest Updates

Great Spotted Woodpecker

The Great Spotted Woodpecker is one of two woodpecker species that we have here at Wellington, the other being the Green Woodpecker.

Goldcrest

The Goldcrest is surprisingly common at Wellington but rather difficult to spot.

Greylag Goose

A very distinctive bird with its pinkish-orange bill and pink legs, the Greylag Goose is a new visitor to Swan Lake, making its first appearance in the spring of 2021.

Latest Updates

Great Spotted Woodpecker

The Great Spotted Woodpecker is one of two woodpecker species that we have here at Wellington, the other being the Green Woodpecker.

Goldcrest

The Goldcrest is surprisingly common at Wellington but rather difficult to spot.

Greylag Goose

A very distinctive bird with its pinkish-orange bill and pink legs, the Greylag Goose is a new visitor to Swan Lake, making its first appearance in the spring of 2021.

Wren

The Wren, one of Britain’s smallest birds, is a resident here at Wellington College.