Butterflies

Butterflies at welly

The Ancient Greeks didn’t have a word for ‘butterfly’; they called them ‘psyche’ – souls. They believed that the chrysalis was the coffin of the ‘worm’ and that what emerged was its soul.

Wellington College’s diverse habitats make it home to at least twenty-six of Britain’s approximately sixty native species of butterfly. We have most of the common British species, and we also have some of the slightly less common species, such as Brown Argus, Marbled White and flourishing colonies of Purple Hairstreak. We are hopeful that we may have Purple Emperors on our sallow scrub, if not already, then very soon.

Two of our native fritillaries, the Silver-washed Fritillary and the Dark Green Fritillary, have been seen here on a number of occasions. The latter is relatively uncommon in this region. Our flagship species, however, has to be our small colony of rare Silver-studded Blues on our heathland. This beautiful small butterfly has a very fragile ecology, which we are working hard to protect.

Latest Updates

Great Spotted Woodpecker

The Great Spotted Woodpecker is one of two woodpecker species that we have here at Wellington, the other being the Green Woodpecker.

Goldcrest

The Goldcrest is surprisingly common at Wellington but rather difficult to spot.

Greylag Goose

A very distinctive bird with its pinkish-orange bill and pink legs, the Greylag Goose is a new visitor to Swan Lake, making its first appearance in the spring of 2021.

Latest Updates

Great Spotted Woodpecker

The Great Spotted Woodpecker is one of two woodpecker species that we have here at Wellington, the other being the Green Woodpecker.

Goldcrest

The Goldcrest is surprisingly common at Wellington but rather difficult to spot.

Greylag Goose

A very distinctive bird with its pinkish-orange bill and pink legs, the Greylag Goose is a new visitor to Swan Lake, making its first appearance in the spring of 2021.

Wren

The Wren, one of Britain’s smallest birds, is a resident here at Wellington College.