Beetles

Beetles at Welly

Beetles are one of the largest orders of insects in Britain, with around four thousand species. They can be found in a huge range of habitats, including underwater. While some are sadly considered pests, many are widely acknowledged as beneficial, such as the aphid-eating ladybirds and the detritivores disposing of rotting vegetation or dung. Here at Welly, we have several species, including Britain’s largest beetle, the Stag Beetle. Sadly, this scarce beetle is threatened by loss of habitat and excessive ‘tidying’ of woodland areas and gardens, removing the decaying wood on which their larvae feed. The Gardens and Countryside team, and also the golf course Greens team leave piles of logs in woodland areas for species such as these.

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Great Spotted Woodpecker

The Greater Spotted Woodpecker is one of two Woodpecker species that we have here at Wellington. The other being the Green Woodpecker. The Greater Spotted Woodpecker can be seen and often heard drumming from the trees as it looks for food in dead branches and also in Springtime can use the drumming to call a mate and establish territory. The Woodpecker nests in holes in trees that it is able to hollow out. It feeds on grubs, bugs and insects and also will take young birds from nests if it gets a chance. It is a fairly common visitor to garden bird feeders on-site as well.

Goldcrest

goldcrest The Goldcrest is surprisingly common at Wellington but rather difficult to spot. Britain’s joint smallest bird, along with the Firecrest, it nests in the

Greylag Goose

A very distinctive bird with its pinkish-orange bill and pink legs, the Greylag Goose is a new visitor to Swan Lake, making its first appearance in the Spring of 2021.

Latest Updates

Great Spotted Woodpecker

The Greater Spotted Woodpecker is one of two Woodpecker species that we have here at Wellington. The other being the Green Woodpecker. The Greater Spotted Woodpecker can be seen and often heard drumming from the trees as it looks for food in dead branches and also in Springtime can use the drumming to call a mate and establish territory. The Woodpecker nests in holes in trees that it is able to hollow out. It feeds on grubs, bugs and insects and also will take young birds from nests if it gets a chance. It is a fairly common visitor to garden bird feeders on-site as well.

Goldcrest

goldcrest The Goldcrest is surprisingly common at Wellington but rather difficult to spot. Britain’s joint smallest bird, along with the Firecrest, it nests in the

Greylag Goose

A very distinctive bird with its pinkish-orange bill and pink legs, the Greylag Goose is a new visitor to Swan Lake, making its first appearance in the Spring of 2021.

Wren

The Wren, one of Britain’s smallest birds, is a resident here at Wellington College. It is more likely to be heard than seen and its tic-tic-tic and strrrrrrr call indicate that they are around.