Species

As you can imagine, all this magnificent landscape supports a fantastic variety of wildlife. Many of you will have seen deer and foxes here or, at least, evidence of them! We also have a huge range of birdlife, from large birds of prey, such as the Red Kite, Buzzard and Tawny Owl, to Britain’s smallest birds, the Goldcrest and Firecrest. We have frogs, toads and newts breeding in our ponds, and we have Grass Snakes, Slow Worms and lizards on the heath. We also have a tremendous array of invertebrates performing vital roles in all these habitats.

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Great Spotted Woodpecker

The Greater Spotted Woodpecker is one of two Woodpecker species that we have here at Wellington. The other being the Green Woodpecker. The Greater Spotted Woodpecker can be seen and often heard drumming from the trees as it looks for food in dead branches and also in Springtime can use the drumming to call a mate and establish territory. The Woodpecker nests in holes in trees that it is able to hollow out. It feeds on grubs, bugs and insects and also will take young birds from nests if it gets a chance. It is a fairly common visitor to garden bird feeders on-site as well.

Goldcrest

goldcrest The Goldcrest is surprisingly common at Wellington but rather difficult to spot. Britain’s joint smallest bird, along with the Firecrest, it nests in the

Greylag Goose

A very distinctive bird with its pinkish-orange bill and pink legs, the Greylag Goose is a new visitor to Swan Lake, making its first appearance in the Spring of 2021.

Latest Updates

Great Spotted Woodpecker

The Greater Spotted Woodpecker is one of two Woodpecker species that we have here at Wellington. The other being the Green Woodpecker. The Greater Spotted Woodpecker can be seen and often heard drumming from the trees as it looks for food in dead branches and also in Springtime can use the drumming to call a mate and establish territory. The Woodpecker nests in holes in trees that it is able to hollow out. It feeds on grubs, bugs and insects and also will take young birds from nests if it gets a chance. It is a fairly common visitor to garden bird feeders on-site as well.

Goldcrest

goldcrest The Goldcrest is surprisingly common at Wellington but rather difficult to spot. Britain’s joint smallest bird, along with the Firecrest, it nests in the

Greylag Goose

A very distinctive bird with its pinkish-orange bill and pink legs, the Greylag Goose is a new visitor to Swan Lake, making its first appearance in the Spring of 2021.

Wren

The Wren, one of Britain’s smallest birds, is a resident here at Wellington College. It is more likely to be heard than seen and its tic-tic-tic and strrrrrrr call indicate that they are around.