Dark Green Fritillary

This large fritillary, while relatively widespread nationally, is scarce and declining in this region. Indeed, the specimen pictured is the only one recorded within a 10km radius in 2020. They have been seen a couple of times in the small area of meadow on our SSSI. They prefer flower-rich grasslands with scrub, and the caterpillar eats species of violet. The Welly Gardens and Countryside team’s careful management of these areas allows plenty of flowers, including violets, to flourish.

Dark Green Fritillary - SSSI grassland - 23.06.20 - Kat Dahl

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